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The Middle Market and Why Freya Should Join It

John La Gatta for Laros Lingerie, c. early 1940s.
Full busted women are allowed two choices when they go lingerie shopping and I'm growing dissatisfied with both. On one side, Tutti Rouge, Cleo, Bravissimo, Curvy Kate, and Evollove reign over the market for youthful spontaneity; the second domain belongs to Fantasie, Fauve, Empreinte, Prima Donna, Panache, and newcomer Harlow and Fox, who offer elegant timelessness and exquisite European laces. As much as I love both, I don't completely relate to either. I've outgrown the juniors' section and I'm not ready for side support panels or full cups. I don't think I'm the only one who feels this way so I've begun to think of myself (us?) as "the middle market". We're the ones who are caught between too cute and too classic. Every full bust brand assumes we're part of their target demographic, while no one seems to be designing anything expressly for us. And that's where Freya comes in...



As bleak as it looks, this market isn't completely empty: independent brands like Britain's Miss Mandalay, Poland's Avocado, and Germany's Fraulein Annie do an excellent job catering to the middle market and two new brands, Sunday Intimates and All Undone, are joining them. They're providing full bust women with understated and comfortable basics, truly striking fashion, risky color combinations and they're unafraid of stepping outside mainstream taste. I also worry that they're struggling to break through because they're so ahead of their time and buyers don't understand who their customer might be. After all, if a full bust brand isn't known for their tediously dependable fit or they can't be counted on for precious flirty fashion, what are they good for?

Meanwhile, Freya, who invented the youthful market and dominated it for years, has outgrown it's own niche. Their direction isn't floundering because they're a bad company, they're simply lost and without a clear vision, they're clinging to an old one. As irksome as their recent missteps have been, it's a wonderful opportunity for the brand to steer into unchartered territory and regain their reputation as an innovative market leader. All the big brands are committed one way or another and they've decided which team they're playing for, but Freya's allegiances are more ambiguous. Freya also possesses the 
power to steer the entire industry in a new direction and with worldwide distribution and modest price points, they could bring this aesthetic to a broader demographic. 

I've made a series of collages to help define what the middle market means to me and how Freya's designs have strayed from what feels current and fresh. I know this won't apply to every women who is a middle market customer, but I thought it would be a good way to start the conversation.

First Column: Avocado Vedette Bra, Beaujais Inking Bra,  Madewell Honeydew Exclusive Brief (sold out)
Second Column: Stella McCartney Tammy Tickling Bodysuit, Arabel Petites Gwenhyfar Knickers and Garter Belt
Third Column: Huit Mrs. Wang Full Cup Bra, Topshop Bodysuit (sold out), Huit Rhapsody Full Cup Bra
Fourth Column: Huit Melisande Half Cup Bra, Huit Cupcake Set (sold out), Avocado Kyoto Short (sold out)
Sheer

Freya hit a home run with the Arabella but since it's semi-retirement, their sheer bras have continually missed the mark. Brands are constantly telling me that teenagers vastly prefer padded bras and older women are the ones who are really buying this style up. My own experiences back them up, I only began wearing sheer sets when I felt comfortable in my body and sexually self assured. However, Freya's latest designs look like they're intended for younger girls, who might be into glittery embroidery, purple butterflies or bright candy pink trim. Instead of trying to win over a reluctant and inflexible clientele, they should concentrate on what women want.

I love sheer lingerie because, unlike padded or opaque styles, they frame my body rather than overwhelm or hide it. Their design doesn't need to be overly complicated or fussy so simple geometrics, graphic lines, scalloped contrasts, and any stark recurring pattern are wonderful. I'm also a HUGE fan of tattoo effects so I'd die from happiness if Freya released a sheer bra made from beige or transparent fabric with a contrast pattern throughout, like the Stella McCartney bodysuit.

First Column: Elle MacPherson Intimates Dentelle Contour Bra, Avocado Lingerie Kyoto Set, Fauve Chloe Bra
Second Column: Anthropologie Embroidered Branches Set, Stella McCartney Jodie Rocking Bra (sold out), Sunday Intimates Dottie Bra
Third Column: Claudette Sophia Bra, All Undone Didi
Fourth Column: Panache Dahlia Bra, Avocado Lingerie Nina set, Marlies Dekker Dames de Paris
Basics

The Deco craze aside, Freya's basics are weak and in the last few seasons, I've watched as they've tried to work it out. This season's black Ohh La La was planned as a continuity, but has been replaced with a pink version for next year. The Marvel has been repeatedly delayed, the Rio has mysteriously returned, and the all new Enchanted boasts "higher under arm coverage" which is a frequent Freya fit complaint. The creators of the Arabella, the Jolie, and the Deco should have a firmer grasp on what we'd like from our basics.

Everyday bras would be a great place for Freya to experiment with androgynous or sporty styles that employ color blocking, straps, larger hardware or pinstripes rather than floral prints and bow accents. Even though it's not traditionally my cup of tea, sleeker or menswear-inspired designs would be a refreshing sight. I'd also like basics with a thinner and more comfortable padding too, like the Sunday Intimates Dottie bra above.

First Column: Pinterest (source unknown), Stella McCartney Sam Partying Bra (sold out), Huit Interview Bra
Second Column: Miss Crofton Picture Perfect Shorts, Stella McCartney Irene Gardening Bra (sold out), November Lingerie Brief (sold out)
Third Column: Huit Arpege Bra, Princess Tam Tam Graffiti Bra, La Lilouche June High Brief
Fourth Column: Avocado Lingerie Annick bra (one size left), Sunday Intimates Sara Set
Seasonal Fashion

Even when they're down, Freya's fashion is some of the best in the business and I can't complain too bitterly when they've made the Russian doll print, kissing flamingos, and a black and tan fan pattern. But, like the Deco situation, I've begun to wonder if they're using their fashion to coast by. Are they releasing prints simply because it's what they've done in the past? Are they adding lace accents because that's what they have on hand, even if it doesn't compliment the rest of the design? How many tiny ribbon bows does the world really need? At market, fashion is the trickiest to sell, but I've heard buyers gasp at the sight of Huit's debuts and I've seen them collide with one another to get a good look at something phenomenal. Freya has the potential to inspire similar reactions, but their bar isn't set high enough.

I want my fashion bras to reflect the rest of my personal style so in my collage, I included several '40s inspired pieces since I own a lot of peplum, puffed sleeves, and pencil skirts that reference that period. I also gravitate towards uncommon colors and textures, but only when they're presented in a straightforward and sophisticated manner. For whatever reason full bust brands refuse to see this essential piece of the puzzle, middle market women want their lingerie to reflect the trends they wear in outerwear. I'm in my mid-twenties and I dress like most people my age, so why wouldn't that concept extend to my lingerie drawer?

What do you think, is there a gap in the full bust lingerie industry?

Are you a member of the middle market?

Do you think Freya should begin designing for this demographic?

43 Comments

  1. I would definitely say I'm a member of the middle market, and I completely agree with you. They have a big opportunity to reign in the market again, and should strongly consider what you've said!

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    1. Thanks for commenting, Laura! I'm happy to hear you relate to this market too and I really, really hope Freya listens to us. :)

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  2. I have to say I love every lingerie you've posted in this post! And yes, I consider myself a member of the middle market as well, so everything you've said hits home.

    I LOVE sheer bras because I dress conservatively. I'm covered from head to toe when I'm outside, so as much as covering up can be sexy, the exhibitionist side of me is itching to show itself, so sheer lingeries are a compromise to me. It is definitely a confident boost for me! :D

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    1. Awesome, it's great to see that my post is relatable because, as you already know, I'll be passing all this feedback on to Freya and I don't want to make the case for anything that's only true for me. Thank you so, so much for commenting, Slique!

      And, OH YEAH, I love skirts down to my knee and turtlenecks so my sheer lingerie belongs to my secret sassy side too. ;)

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  3. Thank you for your post. I am also a lingerie writer but I'm based in Melbourne, Australia.
    Sadly, I am not blessed with generous curves as I have the figure of a 14 year old boy. But I have many beautiful female friends who are and they request recommendations and reference to exactly the market you discuss.
    I too have found through my own research that there is a distinct gap in this market, as well as a lack of demonstrable imagery online. For example a AA sized bra will look and function differently to a FF sized bra. This leads us back to current debates around the lack of full busted models.
    I think your recommendations for Freya are excellent and filling a gap in the market is always a great business strategy.
    So, lets make shopping for lingerie a pleasure for all women, shall we?

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    1. Yes, let's make lingerie shopping a pleasure for all women! I hope we can make a strong case to marketing teams that full busted women want to see their lingerie in photography as it fits them, rather than as it fits someone thinner or smaller breasted.

      I'm glad you like my recommendations for Freya and I hope they see the value in pursuing this market gap.

      Thank you for commenting, Pixie Strong!

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  4. Yes, you have it exactly right! When I was in my early twenties I hadn't quite reached full bust portions, then I spent 8 years being pregnant or nursing babies. Now I am ready to get rid of the nursing bras for good but nothing easily available in full bust sizes feels like it is for me. Cleo feels like it is for my babysitter and Fantasie is for my mother. I want bras like Huit's designs in my size! Thank you thank you for expressing this so well.

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    1. Mae, it feels amazing that this post is something other women are feeling and relating to so really, I should be thanking you! On one of my previous posts, you and a reader named Aurora mentioned feeling similarly and that was a strong catalyst for me to get writing! I had this theory kicking around in my head for awhile, but reading your comments pushed me to follow through on publishing. Thank you.

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    2. I very much agree with Mae. In my twenties, I was a different size and shape, and still very critical of my body (what on earth was I thinking three children ago!), and would never have worn a sheer bra. Then, as Mae writes, it was years of being pregnant and breastfeeding (four years for the youngest), and I lived in ever-baggier Bravado nursing bras.

      I'm 50 now, and love sheer bras as well as styles like the new Simone Perele and Beaujais tattoo bras, and the Marlies Dekker Dame de Paris t-shirt bra (I bought this last one a few months ago on sale), which I'd like to see in more affordable, everyday versions. And things like Mimi Holliday, which are lovely but seem too small for me. I tried my usual size (36F), and felt beyond unsupported.

      Also like Mae, I buy most of my bras online. I live far from any decent bra shops in the country in Canada, and I need affordable shipping. The good thing about Freya is that most of the bras fit me well (some exceptions, including the Deco), so if they give me the choices I want, I'll happily spend my money on Freya bras (at bare necessities, fresh pair, and herroom). But for the past year, there hasn't really been anything to excite me. At the very least, I wish they'd include the Freya Lyla Hazlenut as a basic, sigh...

      Rebecca

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  5. Androgyny is completely missing from large bust brands, in my opinion. I feel like 'girly' and 'sexy' are the only options I'm given, and neither suits my aesthetic. Androgynous is not the same as absolutely plain and beige/white/black, it involves a sense of style, just not a 'feminine' one. There are smaller bust brands making interesting products, but I don't know of any larger bust products of this type. It's as if having breasts of a certain size means that you have to be interested in lace and bows.

    But fit is paramount, so I would buy an over-the-top Tutti Rouge in bubblegum pink before I'd buy something that I liked the look of but which didn't fit me. That's why I have to be honest and say I don't care what Freya's designs look like; as long as their wires are too soft to tack, they're a no-go for me.

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    1. AE, I appreciate your honesty and I'm glad to hear you'd be interested in androgynous styles too. I think Freya's fit, which many, many women seem to have difficulties with, needs to be corrected or experimented with ASAP. It's the single largest topic for feedback I received and I think it's something Freya needs to take a long look at.

      Thank you for commenting!

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    2. AE, a million times yes to this. I am forever taking the bows off of bras! And I'll take a "twee" print over a floral any day.

      The point is nearly moot though - as you mentioned, the Freya wires are too soft and as a 30K/32JJ I'm sized out of most of the other brands. It's a shame; I'd love to throw money at some of these companies! I own two Fraulein Annie bras (neither of which actually fit) just because I adore the aesthetic. And I'm waiting with baited breath for the Ewa release of the navy pinstriped Charlie!!

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  6. I think I just include Freya in the teen / youth market and am just glad there are, as you pointed out a.lready lots of alternatives.

    I have many of these Avocado designs, and the Beaujais Inkling, which are designs I like and fit me better than Freya. Miss Mandalay bras are fun and modern (but doesn't fit my shape). Fleur of England does some amazing designs, eg the Kitty, but is more expensive. Mimi Holliday does beautiful bras in bright laces and fun designs too.

    Freya probably sells well enough not to worry about the 'middle market' and we're pretty well taken care of by other brands ....

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    1. Hey Dorothy! I was hoping you'd weigh in on this one because I know you're already a big fan of the "middle market" brands I listed and you've tried others that I didn't think to include (Mimi Holliday, Fleur of England) but are also selling to an "in between" taste. I agree, Freya's extremely successful and they're selling well enough that they don't have to change anything out of financial necessity.

      However, the brands we're discussing either retail for significantly more than any Freya product and/or are difficult to order from, find from a brick and mortar stockist, etc. I'm not suggesting these are insurmountable challenges or flaws necessarily. The more expensive price point reflects the craftsmanship, quality of materials, and ethical production those brands are committed to and Freya will NEVER be able to compete with that.

      But many "middle market" customers want something that's more convenient (Freya's stocked in Bravissimo and the American department store, Nordstroms) or less expensive, even if it's poorer quality. With the exception of Avocado, a single bra from those independent brands retails for $90+ and some women would prefer an entire set for less than that. I don't think that middle market women don't have the money, they do, but they might shop differently than we do.

      When I met with Freya in August, I told them the gist of this because I had just been to Selfridges and purchased three Mimi Holliday sets (a special treat!). I love my purchases, but if there had been something from Freya that was as appealing, I may have bought two Mimis and one Freya...but that's just not the case right now and I believe they should aspire to that standard in the future.

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    2. You're right about the price point. I guess Fauve was their attempt at the middle market ...

      Honestly, I'm amazed you picked up Mimi Holliday at Selfridge's as they never seem to have my size :-(

      (Avocado have a new web site with an amazing sale on, but forgot to install the payment software, so one can't actually order from them right now. )

      With the others, the issue is less price point, more that shops and even web sites don't stock the full size range the brands produce - ASOS don't and Figleaves rarely do.

      But on the issue of price point, because the shops /sites don't stock my size, it often gets discounted, so for example I picked up several Mimi Holliday sets this week on Amazon UK for less than Freya costs. And Fusspot Lingerie are having a good sale, including Fleur of England http://www.fusspotlingerie.com/Brands/Fleur-of-England.aspx

      I guess I'm saying in around about way that one can shop around, and as a 'middle market' customer I'm more interested in style than fashion, so don't mind 'last season' "looks" ...

      And more importantly, I would be very reluctant to go back to Freya as the quality has become awful and the fit changed. I used to buy a minimum of six Freya bras twice a year, but now I buy one a year and each time regret it.

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  7. Hell yes! Count me as part of the "middle market". I've never related much to most of what is out there in terms of aesthetics, but I'm so used to having a very limited range available in my size that I've sort of learned to like what I had... When I first discovered British full bust brands, I expected Miss Mandalay to grow huge, but somehow, it has not happened. I can't think of one brand doing something similar in the H+ range. Truth is, Claudette not expanding to a K this autumn is one of my biggest disappointment this year!

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    1. Hey Astrid, I will always appreciate a resounding "Hell yes!" and I'm really, really glad you weighed in here. On the Claudette issue, I know and I think Sweets from Sweets Nothing is in total agreement with you, that was a huge let down.

      I always thought the same thing about Miss Mandalay and I feel similarly excited about Sunday Intimates, but they've met some resistance and I think that it goes back to the middle market conversation, we're a misunderstood demographic and lumping us in with flirty or traditional stuff has always been more convenient for brands and buyers alike. I'm glad we're all making some noise to change that though, no one should have to settle for liking whatever is available.

      Thank you for commenting!

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    2. I AM in agreement. I know they don't want to expand until all their styles are ready, but I thought at least they'd test-drive H-cups in 2014. Was very disappointing.

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    3. I can really identify with this comment about learning to like what is available in my size. I have done this for a long time. I would just buy what I could find at Nordstrom's in my size usually beige or black plain bras (I am in Minnesota). Then I started online shopping to get more choices, which are still not what I really want, I was happy for a time to being able to get something colorful. Now I want even more choice. I wonder why manufacturers seem to think that full bust ladies will not buy or do not want the same designs and options that A-D cup ladies do? If it is selling well for other sizes why wouldn't it sell well for DD-K cups? We all want well fitting attractive bras, variety in design choice, and accessibility, don't we?

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  8. Super agree. I feel like I am in the middle market too. My choices are too bright colors and prints or something that feels too old for me. I also continually struggle with finding bras that are affordable (less that $80-100 a pop) and since I think my size recently changed it has become even more difficult with selection and price points.

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    1. Oh gosh, I hate when your boobs change and then everything doesn't fit! I'm sorry. I'm glad to hear that you're encountering a similar market void though because when Freya sees these comments, they'll know how we really feel. Thanks for commenting! :)

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  9. I really love all of the pieces you selected for this post. I think it's crucial that Freya realizes they have the power to guide the market the same way they did when they first come out. Their original accomplishments, creating a vibrant, youthful, flirty full-bust market, are still wonderful and awesome, but now lots of other brands have caught up. It's great for that market's customer, but Freya should really be leading the charge for a more fashion-forward, directional approach, at the same accessible Freya price point. I will always loves brights and frills and silliness, but it's not ALL I love. My style has grown up with me, and I want lingerie pieces that are more stylish, more fashionable, and a little sexier. They've also GOT to offer a new shape for their GG+ and H+ customers-- there have been too many complaints about fit to move forward without addressing it.

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    1. Sweets, you said it brilliantly and you're right, the majority of fit comments I received on my Freya posts were about G+ sizes and how poorly done they've been. Who knows, maybe by Autumn/Winter 2014 we'll be seeing an updated G+ fit AND sophisticated, sexy, directional designs!? Girls can dream! :)

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  10. I love this post and 100% agree. I like some of the Cleo styles as sometimes I do wnat soemthing a bit "fun" but most of the time my style is quite plain and modern. I like nice fabrics, strong colours and clean lines but that is difficult to get from a lingerie company. There are a few brands as you have shown above but most of these stop around a G cup. I love Avocado designs and will probably buy a bra from there at some point but I'm not sure they will fit me and as I have a limited budget for lingerie I hate wasting money on shipping

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    1. Thank you, Lynsey! I'm so, so glad you commented too because the more voices that cry out for these changes, the better the chances are that Freya will listen. I agree with all your requests too, I'd love to see nice fabrics, strong colours, and clean lines!

      In terms of Avocado, Paulina, who is their customer service contact, is wonderful and when you are ready to order, she'll be a terrific help. She's very kind, understandable and her English is great. I definitely recommend you get in touch with them about any fit concerns.

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  11. It's so ridiculous, I would prefer more androgynous bras and more of a middle market, but as a young woman, I have the "junior" market heavily pushed on me because I am so young. When I go for fittings, I find that I'm frequently pressured to buy cleavage bras or things with ridiculous young designs, just because I'm young and short (it begs the question, do you even see what I'm wearing on the outside? I want something similar underneath).

    Just one thing, I didn't realize tall wires were a frequent Freya complaint, but Freya is the only one that makes tall enough wires for me, and that's when I size up to something a bit too big! I feel like in that way, Freya does have a niche in the market. I feel like the market is dominated by short wires!

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    1. Wow, this comment is valuable! Firstly, it's wonderful to hear from someone younger who DOESN'T relate to the designs coming from those youthful market brands. I think that's easy for women to forget (even me) and I didn't know of these companies growing up so it's hard to say what I would've chosen in my teens. Secondly, it's fantastic to hear from a Freya customer
      who DOES like the taller wires. It makes it much easier to understand where Freya's coming from, if I know they have customers who appreciate changes like those.

      Thank you for adding your two cents! :)

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    2. As a teenager (who also happens to be fairly petite) I always get the super-girly, uber-padded bras shown to me in boutiques, no matter how much I try and describe what I really want. Sometimes it feels like if I see another polka dot I'll scream. There's nothing wrong with feminine, it's just not what I'm interested in, especially because they also tend to be padded, which is not something I really hate (it just doesn't work for the shape I feel comfortable with). I tend to follow high fashion, and I've often wished I could turn some of the avant-garde, darker styles that Chanel has done (especially their fw 13/14) into lingerie.

      I know I'm a little late, but I wanted to throw in my two cents.

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  12. I'm definitely "middle market" girl, as I'm not a fan of "fun" bras, but I hate full cups either, I'm in my 30s, so, yeah... I found that some Masquerade and Mimi Holliday designs really call for me, and I think any brand who will make something like that cheaper has a lot of opportunities in "middle market". But I think I will stick with Mimi, as I prefer materials they use more than what Freya uses and I like their wires.

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    1. Oh, I'm happy to hear you're a fan of Mimi! There will be a lot of Mimi love on Miss Underpinnings in the coming weeks because I've just "discovered" how wonderful they are. It's nice to hear from someone else who has turned to brands like Mimi Holliday to replace the fit/design of what Freya offers. It's ironic actually...when I was at the Eveden offices in London, I told them that I had just bought some Mimi, but I would've bought some Freya if any of those bras captured my attention. The rep was surprised at first, she hadn't considered the idea that Freya and Mimi Holliday were competing for the same demographic.

      But exactly, if a brand made that type of design and offered it at a modest price point, I think they'd make a killing. I hope it's Freya.

      Thanks for weighing in!

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  13. I am a successful, professional, recently divorced woman in my late 30s in reasonably good shape who wants her boobs to look pretty. I AM the middle market-- for me there are always 1-2 prints that I love in the Freya collections (even if not the whole thing)-- it's the insult to a large segment of potential customers with the super-sized gores, increase coverage, and wire wrapping around the back that I wish they would change. I guess to me part about getting older/having more money/but spending it more wisely is I pay more attention to quality; it's sort of inherent even in my aesthetic judgements (although I don't think quality=boring!)--- and Freya does not pay attention to quality.

    I wear a 28HH (freya's are stretchy) /30H (probably my "real" size)/30GG (or my "real" size) /30G (in the Freya Rio and nothing else!) and have a very narrow root-- so I can't wear most Freyas; my choices are limited to Cleo and Comexim. I am exceptionally narrow, however, Freya not scaling their wires (as Cleo does) seems ridiculous-- I can imagine that it is a cheaper manufacturing process, however, I ma sure they have a low frequency of purchases and/or repeat customers in the 28-32 G+ size range.It can't be THAT expensive to scale wires/cups correctly- -Cleo does it and their price point is frequently lower.

    (There is always a Cleo or 2 that would work in a given season, but I don't "LOVE" their stuff-- too young. I always lust sadly after 3-5 Freyas that I know just won't work for me-- maybe if their bra's actually fit me I would be pickier about the design details!)

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    1. Kate, thank you for including information on your background because I feel slightly nervous speaking about the taste of people who are either older or younger than I am. I had a hunch that the middle market existed beyond the narrow ideas of age that Cleo and Fantasie design for and with your comment, it shows that there are women of all ages who can't relate to full bust lingerie's polar extremes. I loved your comment: "I AM the middle market".

      Throughout this discussion of Freya, I've been fascinated by the ongoing conversation about the value of Freya's constructions vs. the importance of strong design. They're deeply intwined but it's important that Freya realizes some women would change their buying habits IF they smoothed out fit problems and the design is essential, but not crucial.

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

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  14. I love this post because I feel like I am moving more toward the middle market myself. I find myself wanting bras that are simpler but still have these interesting details to them without feeling too overdone. Your use of the word "understated" really captures what I like about the designs in your collage. What saddens me is how most of the companies offering understated designs are not usually in the fuller-bust market. When Claudette expands to K cups, I plan on snagging one of the Dessous bras, especially in that gorgeous green. I know they do not receive a lot of attention on the blogosphere, but Natori actually does a pretty good job of representing this middle market. Their size range is more limited, but a lot of my customers love them because their bras are basic enough to work for everyday but have these fun little details to keep the design interesting. Great post!

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  15. After reading all the comments on this post, looking at the collage examples again, reading the new post on Mimi Holliday and thinking some more on this topic, I am really hoping Freya considers this middle market. I would love to have these types for bras easily accessible. For me accessibility is not so much about price point, I don't mind spending a little more for something I really like, but about being able to order without having to spend a ton on shipping or return shipping. I want my bra shopping to be just as easy as it is for ladies who can shop at VS or if brick and mortar stores aren't possible I want mail order, that carries full lines, with cheap shipping/return shipping. That's why I buy Freya, Panache, Cleo and Curvy Kate. I tend to settle for what I think is just ok in the style department because it is not risky to order more than one size, find the perfect fit and return the rest. I haven't yet made the leap to order from Mimi Holliday, Miss Mandalay, Avocado and others because I don't want to pay the extra shipping charges and deal with the hassle. I often fall between sizes and like to try a few options to get the best fit. This is a pain to do through mail order. This has become kind of a wondering post, hope it was somewhat understandable. Additionally, I would wear more Freya's if the fit was better, I tend to get a pointy fit in their bras.

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  16. I feel like I'm first and foremost a member of the "we need more H+ cup options!" market. But after that, yes, I'm probably a member of the middle market.

    I want sleek, smart, new designs in exciting color options (where "exciting" does not necessarily mean bright or neon). I want bras that are comfortable and supportive enough to wear for everyday while still being trim enough to wear the rest of my wardrobe on top of them.

    If I never see another full cup beige bra again, it will be too soon. Then again, if I never see another bra with pointless lace or tiny bows on the straps, it will also be too soon. (Ironically, I am sitting here in a full cup beige bra with pointless lace and tiny bows on the straps.)

    As for Freya specifically, I need them to up their game in the fit/support department first. I'm not happy buying fugly bras that fit, but I will buy them. I won't buy bras that I can't comfortably wear.

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  17. Hi Cecily. I have a first response to your post up at my nascent baby blog, Up Front and In Brief. I agree x 1 million, with some cavils, which I'll unpack later -- really, this is huge and it's hard to keep things bite-sized and not write a 300-page white paper on marketing strategy. I hope I summarized you accurately!

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  18. I am 60 and I feel like the "middle market." At 36J, my first concern has to be fit and support but I crave something more subtle.. Basically, I feel most companies use color to provide variety at the "more extreme" ends of the available size range. Totally agree with Tori about Freya needing to fix specific issues such as those terrible flexible wires. I have tried Freya in multiple sizes and styles and have never been able to get one of their gores to tack. Even the sports bra had "crazy flimsy" wires in a J cup.

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  19. Dear Miss Underpinnings, after carefully reading your blog post we wanted to come back to you and respond to your post. Be rest assured the points you have made in your post have been taken seriously and considered by the Freya brand. Thank you for taking your time to meet with us and for providing your feedback so we can continue to move forward and we’d like to thank the comments also made by your readers.

    We would like to take the opportunity to confirm that Freya is dedicated to designing fashion focused and perfectly fitting lingerie and swimwear. We are firm believers that one size doesn’t fit all, and we pride ourselves in creating collections of lingerie, swimwear and sportswear which are bang on trend, providing a perfect mix of fun prints, patterns and colours, catering for women whether they are a 28’ to 38’ back and whether in their 20’s 30’s or 40’s – with high quality supportive collections that go all the way up to a K cup.

    Freya has gained a reputation for its cool and confident award winning creative imagery, which is unveiled every season through its brochures and website and social media pages which have gained a great following. Not only does Freya push the boundaries with its collections but also with its campaigns, being first lingerie brand to use Spotify, QR codes, aurasma as well as take part in certain high profile events.

    Every season Freya introduces a fresh array of collections which showcase Freya’s fun yet edgy personality. We’re incredibly proud that for 2013/2014 Freya was awarded by CoolBrands. Freya was given the 'Cool Brand' badge by a panel of style experts and designers including personalities such as Daisy Lowe and Julien Macdonald and not only was it the only specifically fuller busted lingerie brand but also the only one awarded that goes up to a K cup to be given the title. CoolBrands search out the nation’s coolest brands looking for the best style, innovation, originality, authenticity, desirability and uniqueness, so it’s absolutely fantastic Freya has been named for having such attributes.

    Freya’s latest collections introduced for AW13 optimise the brands energetic and edgy style, as well as a perfectly fitting finish. With lingerie and swimwear collections such as Flourish, Patsy, Tootsie and Cha Cha to name a few all receiving great reactions!

    Equally important is Freya’s basic collections which return every season and have built up a fantastic loyal following. Some of Freya’s essential collections have become the biggest and best selling ranges and a lingerie drawer favourite among many of our fans. At the start of the year Freya launched a yearlong campaign to celebrate its iconic bra Deco, named 365 days of Deco. Freya has received a fantastic reaction to this campaign, with fans entering our Deco Style Wall competition from all around the world. Not only did Freya hit the massive achievement of over 1 million Deco bras but demand for Deco continues to grow further still as well as interest in the range which is brilliant.

    Part of the same brand portfolio, it is great to hear that you have become interested in one of our sister brand’s Huit. Huit’s collections run from an A to E cup, with its collections being focused on smaller cup sizes, and different styles and levels of support offered compared to its larger cup sized sister - Freya.

    For SS14 and AW14 Freya introduces brand new breathtaking collections which are perfectly fitting as well as fashion focused, and it brings back a few old favourites which we hope you will keep an eye out for.

    Once again be rest assured your points are being considered by the Freya team.

    Best Regards
    Freya

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    Replies
    1. Dear Freya... " whether in their 20's 30's or 40's -" women over 50 wear lingerie too.

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  20. Dear Freya,
    Huit bras are totally cuter on average, why?
    Sincerely,
    36FF

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  21. Wow, was anybody else as bummed out by the above Freya comment as I was? Maybe I am taking it the wrong way? That paragraph about liking Huit designs seems to say, "that's nice that you like Huit design but you do know that those bras those are not for large breasts". I have heard enough of that kind of thing in my life. It seems similar to whatever thinking makes them line the cups of sheer bras in the larger cups sizes. Like they are saying large breasts have something to hide. This seems like an odd attitude for a company that caters to large breasts to have. Additionally, Elomi has a beautiful version of Huit's cupcake bra, the Rita. Why can't Freya? Somebody please tell me that I am reading too much into this.

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  22. Hi there Cecily! I will say that I don't know if I am quite ready for the middle market but I am interested in a middle area between a natural shape and the sad excuse for a bust shape for moulded bras. I have very conical breasts in a 38C and I was wondering if you had any suggestions? My breast shape just makes any sheer bra I have tried turn into a pointy mess that looks silly under my more stylish work shirts.

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  23. Dear Miss, I discovered the Prima Donna Twist padded collection. Perfect for my F36. Kind regards.

    ReplyDelete

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